Category Archives: Will Willimon

Miserable Job

On page 53 of Bishop Will Willimon references Patrick Lencioni’s definition of makes a job miserable: “Lack of measurement. Lack of accountability. Anonymity.” I’ve read a few of Lencioni’s books, but not this one (Three Signs of a Miserable Job.) … Continue reading

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Equivocating “Education”

It’s been a while since I’ve dialogued/argued with Will Willimon’s Bishop. Seems like a good time to pick it up again. On page 42 he says, “The United Methodist practice of itineracy is so deeply countercultural that we may be … Continue reading

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Poor God?

I’m not a proponent of the prosperity Gospel. On the contrary, most versions of it sound like heresy. I am, however, a proponent of a Philippians 4:19 Gospel: “My God shall supply all your needs through his riches in glory … Continue reading

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Lead the Mission

In describing the work of appointment making in his book Bishop, Will Willimon frames the big picture this way: “The task of the bishop and the DSs in the appointive process is to send clergy who can lead the mission … Continue reading

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Why Be in Ministry?

In his book, Bishop, Will Willimon says, “The only good reason for anybody to be in ministry is theological.” Why be in ministry? We’re in ministry because of who God is and what God has done in Christ. We’re in … Continue reading

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A Different Future

Will Willimon’s Bishop functions as a study of the episcopacy and as a spiritual autobiography. Reading it, we gain insight into the church, its leadership, and its leaders. Willimon is explicit and plain-spoken about his convictions. At one point he … Continue reading

Posted in Ecclesiology, Local church, Ministry, United Methodism, Will Willimon | 1 Comment

The “Most Revealing Indicator…”

One of the claims Will Willimon makes in his book Bishop is that, “The most revealing indicator of congregational vitality is the trend in worship attendance.” Worship attendance sure is important. I remember many years ago reading a biographical blurb … Continue reading

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